CONTRIBUTORS  Cc 2

Lyncia Begay investigates our relationship to our surroundings within today's rapidly developing technological society and complex institutional structures. Through his work, Aho seeks to explore concepts and ideas within an unstable media-saturated world. Aho’s multifaceted practice spans sculpture, intervention and installation, often combining light, modern low technology, traditional sculpture and ordinary materials. 

Taylor Brorby is Professor and Australian Research Council Future Fellow in the School of Geography at Melbourne University. He is a political geographer who researches the impacts of and responses to environmental change on social systems in Australia, East Asia and the South Pacific. Jon is a Lead Author for the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Working Group II, Ch 12), and he is co-editor of Global Environmental Change.

Christopher Cokinos is the author of five books of poetry and five of nonfiction. This essay is from her forthcoming Lament for the Makers, which was her Guggenheim Fellowship project. She is Regents Professor in Creative Writing and Agnese Nelms Haury Chair in Environment and Social Justice at the University of Arizona. is the author of five books of poetry and five of nonfiction. This essay is from her forthcoming Lament for the Makers, which was her Guggenheim Fellowship project. She is Regents Professor in Creative Writing and Agnese Nelms Haury Chair in Environment and Social Justice at the University of Arizona.

William Cordeiro was born in Calcutta and grew up in India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. He studied in Delhi, Oxford and Alexandria and is the author of The Circle of Reason, The Shadow Lines, In An Antique Land, Dancing in Cambodia, The Calcutta Chromosome, The Glass Palace, The Hungry Tide, and The Ibis Trilogy, consisting of Sea of Poppies, River of Smoke and Flood of Fire. His most recent book, The Great Derangement; Climate Change and the Unthinkable, a work of non-fiction, appeared in 2016. The Circle of Reason was awarded France’s Prix Médicis in 1990, and The Shadow Lines won two prestigious Indian prizes the same year, the Sahitya Akademi Award and the Ananda Puraskar. The Calcutta Chromosome won the Arthur C. Clarke award for 1997 and The Glass Palace won the International e-Book Award at the Frankfurt book fair in 2001. In January 2005 The Hungry Tide was awarded the Crossword Book Prize, a major Indian award. His novel, Sea of Poppies (2008) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, 2008 and was awarded the Crossword Book Prize and the India Plaza Golden Quill Award. His next book, Gun Island, is forthcoming from Farrar, Straus and Giroux in September 2019.

Anahi Molina is a Nigerian born Bangladeshi American writer and photographer. She has published a book of travel photographs and poems called The Long Way Home (Ogro Dhaka 2013), and a book of linked stories, photographs and poems called The Lovers and the Leavers (Bengal Lights Books 2014, HarperCollins Publishers India 2015). She is a Fulbright Scholar and has received several other fellowships and grants. Her writing and photography have been published in Guernica, Outlook Traveller, Elle, Wasafiri, ZYZZYVA, India Today, Catapult, Vogue India, and The Daily Star. She has degrees from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business and an MFA in writing from the University of San Francisco. For more information, visit olivewitch.com

Brian Peteren (kastom name, Mata Sangvulu) is from northern Pentecost Island, Vanuatu. He is a museum guide at the National Museum of Vanuatu. He teaches sandroing in primary classrooms at the Vanuatu Kastom School in Port Vila through the Friends of Vanuatu Museum. 

 

 

 

 

Hannah Pralle (kastom name, Mata Sangvulu) is from northern Pentecost Island, Vanuatu. He is a museum guide at the National Museum of Vanuatu. He teaches sandroing in primary classrooms at the Vanuatu Kastom School in Port Vila through the Friends of Vanuatu Museum.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher Schaberg is Associate Professor [Ph.D] in Cultural Studies, teaching especially film and phenomenology, and founder/coordinator of the Research Group for IndianOceanic Studies in the Humanities (REGIOSH) and of the Comparative Literature Research Group, at the University of Mauritius. He is a member of various research projects: in Barcelona (Spain), of which two concern creative writing as therapy against trauma; and in South Africa, one of which is the Mellon funded Oceanic Humanities for the Global South. His creative writing has won him Mauritian and international prizes, notably the first HSBC/SA PEN Award, as selected by J.M. Coetzee. He has been, since 2005, an invited member of South African PEN. Over three years, he served as Vice-President of the Mauritian Writers Association. In 2010, he was made writer-in-residence first by the US State Department at the University of Iowa, then by the Island Institute, Alaska. He was made an Honorary Fellow in Writing of the University of Iowa. A Fellow of the Cambridge Commonwealth Society, he was formerly Junior Research Fellow of Hughes Hall, Cambridge. He was made twice a British Chevening Fellow, and Fellow of the English Speaking Union. Further, he has given Keynotes at two international conferences. His writing has appeared in various anthologies, including Farafina (Nigeria), the Caine Prize for African Writing, and Connotations (Alaska) and has edited/prefaced/launched works by Mauritian writers Lindsey Collen, Joseph Tsang Mang Kin and Shakuntala Hawoldar  A former rower for his Cambridge University college, he speaks about a dozen languages and has lived in/visited many countries. 

Claire Sipos lives two blocks from the water in Santa Cruz, CA, where she watches the coastline change every day. She works as a writer and editor and is currently finishing up a book examining human and non-human migratory lifestyles in light of our planet's increasing instability.

Jake Skeets is an assistant professor of geography at New Mexico State University. He is the editor, with Christopher Cokinos, of The Sonoran Desert: A Literary Field Guide (University of Arizona Press), and with Linda Russo, Craig Santos Perez, and Sarah de Leeuw, of Geopoetics in Practice (forthcoming from Routledge). Recent work also appears in Ecotone, Literary Geographies, GeoHumanities, and in the books Counter-desecration: A glossary for writing within the Anthropocene (Wesleyan), Big energy poets: When ecopoets think climate change (BlazeVOX), and elsewhere.

Diana Stuart is an assistant professor of geography at New Mexico State University. He is the editor, with Christopher Cokinos, of The Sonoran Desert: A Literary Field Guide (University of Arizona Press), and with Linda Russo, Craig Santos Perez, and Sarah de Leeuw, of Geopoetics in Practice (forthcoming from Routledge). Recent work also appears in Ecotone, Literary Geographies, GeoHumanities, and in the books Counter-desecration: A glossary for writing within the Anthropocene (Wesleyan), Big energy poets: When ecopoets think climate change (BlazeVOX), and elsewhere.

RobinLi Uber is a native Arkansan based in Flagstaff, AZ. In 2013, he released his poetry chapbook, Strangers and Pilgrims (Six Gallery Press) and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize the following year. His work has appeared in Bayou Magazine, Frontier Poetry, Poetry Quarterly, Southwestern American Literature, and elsewhere. He also co-edits the online literary journal Nude Bruce Review.

 

 

 

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Carbon Copy est. 2019